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Thylacine Rediscovered—Or Not

It made big headlines. Neil Waters, the president of the Thylacine Awareness Group out of Australia, claims to have captured several living thylacines on a wildlife camera trap set in Tasmania. “I know what they are and so do a few independent expert witnesses,” he says. “We believe the first image is the mum, we know the second image is the baby because it’s so tiny and the third image…is the dad…the baby has stripes”. Others, though, were quick to throw cold water on these claims. A spokesperson for thylacine expert Nick Mooney at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) announced that, after viewing the video, Mooney “concluded, that based on the physical characteristics shown in the photos provided by Mr Waters, the animals are very unlikely to be thylacines, and are most likely Tasmanian pademelons.” Curiously, perhaps, the video Mr. Waters uploaded to YouTube shows not the thylacines—but him, talking about the video of the thylacines.

I highly doubt they captured video footage of living thylacines. I have doubts that there are any living thylacines, and if there are, they’re still probably doomed. Any living population would be so small at this point that, due to inbreeding, the species would go extinct in a few years anyway. No, the best hope we have for seeing living thylacines is through cloning. Bring them back, I say! We (humans) killed them off, but thanks to technology we can fix that mistake.

By The Evil Cheezman

WAYNE MILLER is the owner and creative director of EVIL CHEEZ PRODUCTIONS (www.evilcheezproductions.blogspot.com, www.facebook.com/evilcheezproductions), specializing in theatrical performances and haunted attractions. He has written, produced and directed (and occasionally acted in) over a dozen plays, most of them in the Horror and Crime genres. His first novel, THE CONFESSIONS OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER: WEREWOLF, is available for purchase at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/734763

MORTUI VELOCES SUNT!

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