werewolf, werewolves and lycans

38

The Werewolf’s Cousin: The Werefox

Today we’re going to mix it up a bit and take a look at a different kind of shapeshifter. After one of our readers asked about werefoxes I figured, why the hell not? They may not be werewolves but they fall into the same shapeshifting furry family. So today we’ll take a tiny break from werewolves and look into the world of werefoxes.

Northern China is home to quite a few werefox stories, in the legends werefoxes inhabit the netherworld between the material plane and the unseen dimensions. They can take human form though, and in this form they appear as gorgeous girls and young men. But even in human for they still have a fox tail, a tail that occasionally pops out of their clothing (after all it would be pretty difficult to hide a big fluffy tail).

The male werefoxes and the female werevixens can mate with normal humans, but if a person were to mate with one of these weres it could turn them into the foxes’ zombie-like slave.

A werefox will lose control of its human form when it sleeps, or when it has too much alcohol to drink. So if you suspect someone of being a fox then simply get them super drunk or knock them out. Simple enough.

Now we move to the Unites States – while most people are familiar with the Native American legends about werewolves (thanks to Twilight) it was the fox that many Native American sorcerers preferred to shapeshift into. Even though most tribes consider the fox as an instrument of negativity, evil magicians loved this form. A werefox may not be able to rip someone to shreds like a werewolf, but in many myths it could place a terrible curse on someone’s head instead.

If you guys are interested in hearing about other types of shapeshifters then leave a comment letting me know and maybe I’ll give you some other types of shapeshifters (there’s a lot out there). Werewolves are our number one love, but it’s nice to take a peek at their cousins.

– Moonlight

One of the writers for werewolves.com, as well as vampires.com.


Chinese loreNative Americannative american beliefsnative american lorewerefoxwerefoxeswerewolf historywerewolf lore

moonlight • March 16, 2010


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