werewolf, werewolves and lycans

The Gruesome Case of Peter Stubb

Peter Stubb was a once human changed into werewolf that was put to trial in 1573. His crime was turning into a werewolf and committing several horrendous acts. Burning up the countryside with his uncontrollable rage and vicious urges, Stubb was being accused of killing much of the livestock within the country of Cologne, which was where the trial was being held. In addition to destroying this vital way of life, Stubb was also charged with killing two pregnant women, in only the most violent of ways, and the lives of 13 children. These crimes were only a few of those that Stubb confessed to and was being put on trial for. During his time as a werewolf, Stubb was also said to have extreme sexual allure and prowess. Because of this the legend also goes that he had an endless supply of mistresses, one of which was his own daughter.

While on trial, Stubb admitted that he did commit the crimes he was being accused of but pretty much claimed that the Devil made him do it. Stubb told the story of how, when he was 12 years old, the Devil gave him a magic belt. When he slipped this belt of magic powers around his waist, it gave him magical powers that allowed him to change into wolf form. However, it was this belt that was his downfall.

Peter Stubb was traveling the woods one day when hunters followed him and cornered him. Unfortunately for Stubb, the magic belt that gave him all his powers came off accidentally. Stubb pointed to where the belt was to show the hunters what had turned him into a wolf in the first place. The hunters looked to where Stubb was pointing but found nothing there, much less a magic belt. The theory then went that the Devil had taken it back to where it rightfully belonged.

Even more unfortunately for Stubb, this “Devil’s magic belt” defense did nothing for him at trial. Stubb was sentenced to severe torture before being beheaded and executed. The saddest part of the legend though is that not only Peter Stubb died for his crimes. Because one of his mistresses and his daughter were found to be accomplices, they were also burned to death.


peter stubbwerewolf crimeswerewolf executionswerewolf legends

kate • October 23, 2009


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