werewolf, werewolves and lycans

Chill, Kill, Or Ill? Kill!

For the benefit of those who aren’t familiar, there have always been three major theories concerning the demise of the “Mega-Fauna” at the end of the last Ice Age, approximately 10,000 years ago. These three theories have become known collectively as “Chill, Kill, or Ill.” In other words, either the animals were wiped out by Climate change (“chill” would actually be incorrect, as the world was in fact getting warmer and not colder, but “warm” doesn’t rhyme with the other two), they were hunted to extinction by primitive humans (that would be “kill”) or an outbreak of diseases took them off the playing field (“ill”). One of these three is, or a combination of them are, the prevalent theory/theories. New evidence suggests that the theory involving humans is correct. It was “kill” all along. Don’t expect this to be definitive among the scientific community, but it’s sure to become a major talking point in the ongoing debate.

This is impressive, as far as it goes, for our ancestors. Considering the size and effort iy would have taken to take down those oversized beasts, and the nerve. We aren’t just talking about herbivores, here, like the Wooly Mammoth or the Wooly Rhinoceros. Those would have been dangerous enough, even if they weren’t also hunting the humans at the same time the humans were hunting them. Among the mega-fauna were creatures like Sabertooths, enormous Cave Bears, and Direwolves.


WAYNE MILLER is the owner and creative director of EVIL CHEEZ PRODUCTIONS (www.evilcheezproductions.blogspot.com, www.facebook.com/evilcheezproductions), specializing in theatrical performances and haunted attractions. He has written, produced and directed (and occasionally acted in) over a dozen plays, most of them in the Horror and Crime genres. His first novel, THE CONFESSIONS OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER: WEREWOLF, is available for purchase at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/734763

MORTUI VELOCES SUNT!

The Evil Cheezman • May 6, 2018


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