werewolf, werewolves and lycans

A TRIP TO WEREWOLF COUNTRY: Driving Bray Road, Part One

If you’ve only heard of Bray Road, near the little town of Elkhorn, Wisconsin, as it relates to the legendary Beast of Bray Road—a creature that has been seen numerous times by numerous people and fits to a T the proverbial physical description of a werewolf straight out of a Hollywood Horror flick—you’d be forgiven for imagining Bray Road to be a stretch of crumbling roadway leading through a wilderness, all but devoid of human life, a true “road to nowhere.” This conceptualization is false in every respect. In reality, Bray Road is well populated. A lot of people live on that road, even if there are stretches where you don’t see any houses, just fields.



Like most of the entire State of Wisconsin, Bray Road occupies and is comprised of—and meanders its way through—farmland.


The ideas I had in my head of what Wisconsin would look like were closely accurate—gentle rolling hills of farmland—and my mental picture of Bray Road was likewise accurate, except that in my mind’s eye not so many people lived on it.

Just in case anybody doubts that I was really there.


Bray Road itself is only some couple’a-three miles long and it runs right into the Interstate. So much for it being remote. Going from Alabama with a daily high in the mid-90s to Wisconsin with a daily high in the mid-60s threw my rental car’s tire pressure sensors into a tizzy, and I had to stop at a nearby service station-slash-Burger King to air up my tires.

As a matter of fact, while on a stretch of Bray Road, the sign for that service station-slash-Burger King is clearly visible, so this should give you an idea of just how NOT remote Bray Road really is.


The Evil Cheezman • September 10, 2019


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